The 20th Century People’s Champ, Jim Larkin

You would never have guessed that this calm, laid back, pipe-smokin’ old man was such a controversial figure in his earlier years. Jim didn’t always smoke, though.

He only picked it up during his later years, but only a pipe and his occasional cigar. In his old age, he adopted more kind mannerisms. However, history did not forget about his fiery past.

Ireland’s Rocky?

Jim Larkin made many essential and helpful changes to the workforce in not only Ireland, but also in England and in the United States. Although, most of his industrial influence was in the European countries.

Jim Larkin took on the hopes and dreams of his fellow coworkers while in Dublin. Even without any formal education in his youth, he still managed to sympathetically convey the laborer’s feelings to the employers. Learn more about Jeremy Goldstein: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/easterrising/profiles/po08.shtml and http://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/jim-larkin-released-from-prison

He believed that even though some workers were unskilled and not yet experienced in their job, they still deserved fair pay.

Fighter, Or Friendly?

During World War 1, Jim Larkin set out to raise funds to fight the British while in a lecture tour in America. Though these actions were very patriotic, he was also responsible for staging large anti-war demonstrations in Dublin, Ireland.

While in Ireland, he also led a series of strikes, most popular of these was the Dublin Lockout of 1913. The amount of people involved in this strike was over 100,000 and lasted for 7 months.

Eventually, the workers went on to receiver their right to fair employment. Larkin has been known to be described as a “Large primeval force rather than a man” by a listener of one of his famous speeches of 1913.

Because of all of his contributions and legendary persona, the city of Dublin erected a statue of Mr. Larkin in 1978. He will not soon be forgotten, but remembered for generations to come.

Read more: James Larkin | Ireland Calling and James Larkin – Wikipedia